Sara Wars – Return Of The Year-End

Screen Shot 2014-03-13 at 10.58.46 AMIn a galaxy far, far away…

I wrote a post at the end of the year all about highlights. I love the way we call it ‘new year’ rather than ‘year-end’ – it shows we’re looking forward. The phrase has a hop of hope and jump of joy about it. Year-end doesn’t quite have that happy ring, especially for my alter-ego.

I’m in a saga of split-personalities at the moment. Let’s call the saga Sara Wars. By day (or at least, more often than I’d like), I am Sara the Reluctant Accountant. By night (or, really, at all times I’m not at the ‘dayjob’), I am Sara the Editor, with her own business (one which will hopefully one day make it possible to be Sara the Recovering Accountant). And I am Sara the Writer, soon to be Published Author. The latter give me more joy than I ever hoped to find. But they take time. They take effort and energy.

I am not ungrateful or regretful regarding the fact I qualified as an accountant. I have gained invaluable skills and I have met priceless people. But at year-end, the dark side encroaches on all other aspects of life and I resent it. There is so much to doooo – and it doesn’t get me any closer to building a bigger, more successful business or being published and becoming a better writer – it steals me away from those goals.

This year, I’m committed to more than one entity that needs accounting for. One is the company that employees me. One is a friend’s business. One is a charitable trust. And one is my own enterprise. Don’t even get me started on the personal tax returns on the horizon, an army of Imperial Stormtroopers.

But however thinly we find ourselves spread. However Darth Vadery the numbers become. However much the Death Star of Compliance takes our time and tries to break us… There has to be an accounting.

In all walks of life, for all our alter-egos, there has to come a time, whether it be year-end or otherwise, when it’s time to take stock. It’s time to spend some time reviewing exactly what we’ve done, how far we’ve come, figure out the figures, and plan the best steps to succeed in the time ahead.

Death and Taxes. They come to us all. They are sinister and unfriendly. But we owe them – they come for us and call us to account for our activities. In the meantime, the saga continues. See you on the other side, when I may or may not give you further installments, including The Inland Revenue Strikes Back and Attack of the Auditors.

Do you cope well or choke on resentment when you have to take time away from your dreams? Do you find it hard to account for yourself? Is the Death Star of Compliance ruining anyone else’s day? 

18 thoughts on “Sara Wars – Return Of The Year-End

  1. saraletourneau

    I absolutely hate it when life gets in the way of writing. And I mean, ab-so-lute-ly HATE it. *lol* But I’ve learned to let go of the resentment. It doesn’t do us any good to hang onto it. In fact, it’s always made me feel worse! So, the attitude I’ve built over time is, “You know what? I don’t like what’s happening right now, but it’s OK. It’s only temporary. I will have time to write very soon.” And that helps put a more positive, hopeful spin on the situation.

    Love all your Star Wars references! They’re very clever. It’s tax season here in the U.S., too. I still need to finish filing my returns. *groans* Hope you can climb out of the accounting mud sooner rather than later. How much longer until things slow down again?

    Reply
    1. Sara Litchfield Post author

      Awesome you’ve learned to let go of the resentment – I need some training 🙂 you’re right – as long as you’ve got your goals set, the set-backs are temporary… It’s probably going to be a few weeks (6?!) until things calm down… but they will, they will… good luck with your returns 🙂

      Reply
      1. saraletourneau

        6 weeks?? Eeeeeeeeeeeek. Well, make sure you relax when you can – and drink lots of tea, be it English Breakfast, chamomile, or another of your choosing. 🙂

        It takes some time to learn to let go of the resentment. Part of it is accepting the fact that as a writer who has another full-time job and other commitments, you just can’t write all of the time. Easier said that done, of course, but it can be done. I’m limited pretty much to weekends as well as weekdays / weeknights here and there (weeknight goes pretty late, so I make sure I don’t have work the next day! *lol*). So I totally understand it’s not easy – because I’d love to write more often too!

        Reply
        1. Sara Litchfield Post author

          Thanks 🙂 I’m drowning in tea as I type! I’m working on it – it helps to see so many people in the same situation, writing around the edges and being zen about it… At least we can find time at all 🙂

          Reply
  2. ontyrepassages

    There’s a book in me about all the things that have ever taken me away from writing. There’s also a book in me about how all those things made me the writer I am today. I didn’t always have that attitude. I cursed the responsibilities and compliances that stole my time, and I still groan in misery, but now I remind myself that they’re all life and life is required for a writer. Of course, that doesn’t make me excited to have my taxes done. 🙂

    Reply
    1. Sara Litchfield Post author

      Lol I could definitely fill a book with my moaning! But yes, we can use some of this some day – remember the feelings of frustration and loss and put them to paper… If I could *just* be a writer, I probably wouldn’t appreciate it half as much as I do when I have time to dedicate myself to writing… The less said about taxes the better :p

      Reply
  3. Deborah Makarios

    “… There has to be an accounting.” I think you may have just accidentally made being an accountant cool. As in mask-and-your-own-comic cool.

    I confess (and if you’ve read more than oh, say, one of my blog posts you’ll know this) that I reacted with much whingeing and little grace to having to have a day job – one that wasn’t at all related to what I studied. But I’m gone now, so hopefully my former colleagues are getting a little peace and quiet 🙂

    Let the white hot heat of frustration forge the steel of your determination – then go forth and flourish.

    Reply
    1. Sara Litchfield Post author

      Ah thank you – I’ve been trying to make being an accountant cool for years! And I’ve just edited a book by an accountant who ‘wants to make audit sexy’ – so long as we all stand together we will overcome! Yes, grace… I need to start searching for some of that – my DDJ winging is becoming annoying even to my nearest and dearest! Hope you’re loving being on the other side 🙂 Promise to join you there sooooooon.

      Reply
  4. swiveltam

    I’m a bit of a roller coaster and it depends on what I’m working on. When I was doing NaNo, EVERYTHING, felt like it took me away from writing. But not that the temps are warming up and I’ve been outside, I don’t feel the pull of write, write, write, edit, edit, edit.

    Also, when I was first learning how to blog and post and setting up twitter and linkedin and pinterest and fb, it was hard NOT to keep at it. I was afraid I would forget how to do something. I’m finding more balance, but still have those frenzied, all consuming feelings of resentment that my family wants me to make them dinner. I touched on these ideas on a couple of my writerly blogs. LOL! Great post Sara 🙂 Keep struggling for the balance!

    Reply
    1. Sara Litchfield Post author

      Lol I’m a roller coaster too – as long as we’re enjoying the ride 🙂 balance in the force is elusive… But we’ll get there! My bf has been away for 2 weeks for work so I haven’t cooked dinner in a fortnight lol – hopefully, when he’s back I’ll appreciate that I’m happy to have someone to cook dinner for 🙂 I know I am – it’s hard not to rant when the blog seems to encourage the outlet though!

      Reply
  5. Nicole Grabner

    I like your graphic – a LOT! 🙂 It’s interesting that you just posted this as I was thinking about the 9-5 job thing and how by day I’m one thing but by night (and mostly any other chance I can get) I’m pre-published author (thank you Kristen Lamb.) 🙂 It’s hard to believe that there will come a time that I can “shed” the day cloak and do my passion full-time, but like you, I’m also grateful with what I have right now. Guess we have to, “just keep swimming!” 🙂

    Reply
    1. Sara Litchfield Post author

      Absolutely 🙂 and the longer it takes, the better the cloak-shedding will feel! I remember quitting my first ‘real’ job after four years and the feeling was indescribable… At the time, I didn’t realise I’d put myself back in a similar position some day… But life is *so* much better than it was back then, and I need to remember that… The very idea of being a pre-published author would have been impossible then – it’s not now, despite the day cloak… So there’s a lot to be grateful for 🙂

      Reply
  6. Helena Hann-Basquiat

    Hello darling. I can sum up my answer to you in one sentence: I am taking Monday off so that I can write. You know the story goes that Elvis Costello recorded his first album on sick days. He was working at an Elizabeth Arden factory as a computer programmer. Can you imagine the tedium of his life?
    Now he’s a legend.
    Sometimes you have to do what you have to do, which makes those times when you get to do what you love to do that much sweeter. I wish a very sweet life for you!

    Reply
    1. Sara Litchfield Post author

      Well that’s awesome 🙂 I hope Monday goes good! I didn’t know that about Elvis Costello! His co-workers must have been surprised, just thought he was this sickly guy, then Boom!

      And thank you 🙂 I wish a sweet life right back at you – we’ll look back on these days when we’re rich and famous and smile knowingly… I wonder if I’ll even remember what a slog March-April used to be :p

      Reply
      1. Helena Hann-Basquiat

        The story of how he got discovered is even better. He set himself up on a London street outside the record company’s office with a guitar and mic and amplifier and just stared playing until he got their attention. When he finally got signed to a record label, he said the only way he would sign is if it was at least as much money as he was making at the factory. He had a young wife to support. (Sorry – in another life I’m a musical journalist.)

        Reply

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